Artimage and the Turner Prize

Artimage holds twenty-six Turner Prize winning and Turner Prize nominated artists in its collection. Explore them all here, starting with 2017 nominee, Hurvin Anderson.

Artimage and the Turner Prize

Since its inception in 1984, the Turner Prize has become known as one of the best and most celebrated visual arts prizes in the world. Part of its powerful presence on the global art stage lies in its ability to provoke debate around contemporary art, largely by championing the early careers of boundary-pushing, influential artists, such as Damien Hirst, Gilbert & George and Tracey Emin.

Each year, just four artists are shortlisted. Artimage’s image collection contains works from 19 Turner Prize nominated artists and 7 Turner Prize winners, including 2017 nominee, Hurvin Anderson.

Explore and license images below.

Hurvin Anderson, 2017 nominee

Hurvin Anderson is one of 2017’s four Turner Prize nominees. His work is largely painted on canvas and paper and shifts between the abstract and the representational, paying homage to his cultural history while also exploring themes of memory, identity and nationhood. License Hurvin Anderson’s works here.


Untitled, 2010
Untitled, 2010
Welcome: Carib, 2005

Welcome: Carib, 2005

Simon Starling, 2005 winner

Winner of the 2015 Turner Prize, Simon Starling’s installation-based artworks are informed by nature, technology and economics. Concerned largely with the transformative: journeys, the past and the present, Starling describes his work as ‘the physical manifestation of a thought process’. License Simon Starling’s works here.

Burn Time, 2010

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Autoxylopyrocycloboros, 2006
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Jeremy Deller, 2004 winner

Jeremy Deller is a celebrated English conceptual, video and installation artist whose subject matters often centre on political and social themes. From his Iggy Pop life drawing class in 2016 to 2007's Speak To The Earth And It Will Tell You, which saw gardening communities in Münster keep plant diaries for ten years, his artistic works are highly varied. License Jeremy Deller's works here.

Karl Marx 18.12.2000, 2000

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The Uses Of Literacy, 1997

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Keith Tyson, 2002 winner

Alongside his “studio wall drawings”, which act as a journal for his thoughts and practice, Keith Tyson’s artworks span a wide variety of mediums, from silicone rubber and resin sculpture to complex pencil drawings and oil paintings. He also explores works where he has very little control over the outcome, such as unpredictable chemical nature paintings and algorithmic computer-generated works. License Keith Tyson’s works here.

Nature Painting, 2010

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Feb 2009 - This Persistent Lump in Your Sea of Tears, 2009

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Martin Creed, 2001 winner

Creed approaches art making with humour, anxiety and experimentation, and with the sensibility of a musician and composer. Underpinning everything he does is his open ambiguity about what art is. 

In 2001, he was awarded the Turner Prize for Work No 227: The Lights Going On and Off, which was exactly what its title describes, in an empty gallery. License Martin Creed’s works here.

Work No. 253, THINGS, 2004

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Work No. 748, 2007

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Damien Hirst, 1995 winner

Damien Hirst is one of the UK’s most influential contemporary artists, who in 1988 organised the seminal Freeze exhibition, which featured many artists who then became known as the ‘Young British Artists’ (YBAs). His work ponders the problems of human existence, and in particular, our reluctance to confront death, the fragility of life, and the nature of love and desire. License Damien Hirst’s works here.

Apotryptophanae, 1994

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The Kingdom, 2008 (side view)

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Richard Long, 1989 winner

Richard Long’s art has always shown an abundant respect for nature, and in the 1960s, his work was connected with the beginnings of Land Art, Conceptual Art, and Arte Povera. His ground-breaking A Line Made by Walking combined pioneering elements of ritual, sculpture and simplicity. License Richard Long’s works here.

A Line Made by Walking, 1967

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Aconcagua Circle, 2012

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Gilbert & George, 1986 winner

‘Art for all’ is the belief that underpins Gilbert & George’s art. Their trademark format is the large grid, with a square or rectangular picture broken into sections that becomes a unified field of signs and images. The artists believe that everything is potential subject matter for their work, and they have always addressed social issues, taboos and artistic conventions. License Gilbert & George’s works here.

SPEAKERS, 1983

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WAS JESUS HETEROSEXUAL?, 2005

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Alongside these 6 Turner Prize winners, Artimage’s catalogue also holds images by the following 19 Turner Prize nominees, all of which can be licensed at Artimage:

Hurvin Anderson 2017; David Shrigley 2013; Dexter Dalwood 2010; Roger Hiorns 2009; Mark Titchner 2006; Yinka Shonibare 2004; Langlands & Bell 2004; Anya Gallaccio 2003; Jake & Dinos Chapman 2003; Catherine Yass 2002; Tracey Emin 1999; Jane and Louise Wilson 1999; Sam Taylor-Johnson 1998; Peter Doig 1994; Hannah Collins 1993Vong Phaophanit 1993; Ian Davenport 1991; Fiona Rae 1991 and Richard Hamilton 1988.


How to license an image

To request an image, log in or register for an account.

Need help? Contact our team for expert guidance on finding the right image for your project. Email artimage@dacs.org.uk or call +44 (0) 20 7780 7550. 


Related pages


Images from the top: Untitled, 2010, Hurvin Anderson. © Hurvin Anderson. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017; Welcome: Carib, 2005, Hurvin Anderson. © Hurvin Anderson. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Richard Ivey; Burn Time, 2010, Simon Starling. © Simon Starling. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Image courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin. Photo: Jens Ziehe; Autoxylopyrocycloboros, 2006, Simon Starling. © Simon Starling. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Image courtesy The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd., Glasgow; Karl Marx 18.12.2000, 2000, Jeremy Deller. © Jeremy Deller. All rights reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Image: © Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre; The Uses Of Literacy, 1997, Jeremy Deller. © Jeremy Deller. All rights reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Image: © Arts Council Collection, Southbank Centre; Nature Painting, 2010, Keith Tyson. © Keith Tyson. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Ian Parsons Photography; Feb 2009 - This Persistent Lump in Your Sea of Tears, 2009. © Keith Tyson. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Image courtesy Keith Tyson Projects; Work No. 253, THINGS, 2004, Martin Creed. © Martin Creed. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017; Work No. 748, 2007, Martin Creed. © Martin Creed. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017; Apotryptophanae, 1994, Damien Hirst. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Image courtesy White Cube; The Kingdom, 2008 (side view), Damien Hirst. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd; A Line Made by Walking, 1967, Richard Long. © Richard Long. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Richard Long; Aconcagua Circle, 2012, Richard Long. © Richard Long. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Richard Long; SPEAKERS, 1983, Gilbert & George. © Gilbert & George. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Gilbert and George Studio; WAS JESUS HETEROSEXUAL?, 2005, Gilbert & George. © Gilbert & George. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2017. Photo: Gilbert and George Studio.